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"I want to thank the Arms Control Association … for being such effective advocates for sensible policies to stem the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, and most importantly, reduce the risk of nuclear war."
– Senator Joe Biden
January 28, 2004
Daryl G. Kimball

Daryl Kimball Discusses NPT at the Carnegie Endowment

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On March 31, ACA Executive Director Daryl Kimball spoke on a panel at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace alongside Ambassador Susan Burk and Deepti Choubey.  The panel "Towards a Succssful NPT Review Conference" discussed the U.S. goals for the upcoming NPT Review Conference, critical issues, and measures of success.

 

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On March 31, ACA Executive Director Daryl Kimball spoke on a panel at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace alongside Ambassador Susan Burk and Deepti Choubey.  They discussed the upcoming NPT Review Conference.

Next Steps on New START

Daryl G. Kimball

U.S. and Russian negotiators, with a push from Presidents Barack Obama and Dmitry Medvedev, have concluded the most important strategic nuclear arms reduction treaty in nearly two decades. The New Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty (START), which will be signed in Prague April 8, puts Washington and Moscow back on the path of verifiable reductions of their still-bloated Cold War nuclear arsenals and renewed cooperation on other vital nuclear security priorities.

The treaty would limit each side to no more than 700 deployed strategic nuclear delivery vehicles and 1,550 deployed strategic warheads, which is 30 percent below the existing warhead limit. Just as importantly, New START would replace the 1991 START verification regime, which expired last December, with a more effective and up-to-date system to monitor compliance for the 10-year life of the new pact.

New START will restore strategic stability and predictability. It is a concrete example of U.S. and Russian action on disarmament that will bolster support for measures designed to strengthen the nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty (NPT) at the May review conference.

The conclusion of the treaty after a year of intensive, up-and-down U.S.-Russian negotiations is a significant diplomatic achievement for the Obama team. Yet, the signing of New START is only the first step toward the president’s goal of reducing “the number and the role of nuclear weapons” worldwide.

New START will still leave the United States and Russia with thousands of excess nuclear weapons that are liabilities in the effort to curb proliferation and combat terrorism. Obama and Medvedev should announce their readiness to resume consultations on the next round of nuclear arms reductions. As Hillary Rodham Clinton suggested during a January 2009 hearing on her nomination as secretary of state, such talks should be broadened to include the verifiable elimination of all warhead types: deployed and nondeployed, strategic and nonstrategic.

To boost momentum at the upcoming NPT meeting, Obama and Medvedev should also invite the world’s other recognized nuclear-armed states to engage in a high-level dialogue on how to make their nuclear capabilities more transparent, create greater confidence, and move toward the eventual elimination of all nuclear weapons.

Most immediately, the administration must undertake a smart, government-wide effort to mobilize the Senate to consider and approve the new treaty before year’s end—a task made all the more difficult by partisan rancor on the president’s domestic agenda.

To succeed, the overwhelming national security value of New START and the dangers of delay or defeat of the treaty must be made clear. The White House already demonstrated the strong and visible backing for the treaty from Secretary of Defense Robert Gates and Adm. Michael Mullen, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, as well as key Republican national security figures, including former Secretaries of State George Shultz and Henry Kissinger. Sen. Richard Lugar (R-Ind.), the ranking member of the Foreign Relations Committee, has said he will help the committee “work quickly to achieve ratification of the new treaty.”

The administration must continue to make it clear that concerns raised by other Republican senators, including Jon Kyl (Ariz.), about limitations on U.S. missile defense programs and the verifiability of the new treaty have already been addressed. Obama resisted 11th-hour Russian proposals for limitations on U.S. plans for missile interceptor deployments designed to counter Iran’s short- and medium-range missiles; New START limits only U.S. and Russian strategic offensive weapons. As previous U.S.-Russian nuclear arms control agreements did, New START will merely acknowledge the offensive-defensive relationship in the nonbinding preamble.

Kyl, who in 2003 praised the brevity of the 2002 Strategic Offensive Reductions Treaty and called START and its monitoring provisions a “700-page behemoth” that “would not serve America’s real security needs,” now bemoans the loss of certain START verification practices. In reality, New START features a more effective, transparent verification method that demands quicker data exchanges and notifications than its predecessor. It modifies or eliminates costly practices not directly relevant for today’s post-Cold War needs. New START will also include new and innovative techniques to identify each side’s strategic delivery vehicles and verify with high confidence actual warhead deployment levels.

Despite a 10 percent increase in the administration’s funding request for nuclear weapons infrastructure modernization, Republican senators have also suggested that verifiable U.S.-Russian strategic arsenal reductions would be imprudent without even greater funding increases and the pursuit of a “modern warhead.” In fact, the U.S. nuclear weapons labs have more than enough resources to maintain the reliability of all major warhead types through their ongoing Life Extension Programs. New-design warheads and the renewal of nuclear testing are technically unnecessary and would undermine the U.S. nonproliferation effort.

Delaying action on the follow-on to START and rekindling U.S.-Russian nuclear competition is unwise and dangerous. New START promises to enhance U.S. and global security by further reducing excess Cold War strategic nuclear weapons.

U.S. and Russian negotiators, with a push from Presidents Barack Obama and Dmitry Medvedev, have concluded the most important strategic nuclear arms reduction treaty in nearly two decades. The New Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty (START), which will be signed in Prague April 8, puts Washington and Moscow back on the path of verifiable reductions of their still-bloated Cold War nuclear arsenals and renewed cooperation on other vital nuclear security priorities.

The treaty would limit each side to no more than 700 deployed strategic nuclear delivery vehicles and 1,550 deployed strategic warheads, which is 30 percent below the existing warhead limit. Just as importantly, New START would replace the 1991 START verification regime, which expired last December, with a more effective and up-to-date system to monitor compliance for the 10-year life of the new pact. (Continue)

Ministers Urge NATO Nuclear Policy Review

Caitlin Taber and Daryl G. Kimball

The foreign ministers of five NATO countries last month called for a discussion of what the alliance can do to advance nuclear arms control and said “the inclusion of sub-strategic nuclear weapons in subsequent steps towards nuclear disarmament” should be part of the discussion.

Steven Vanackere of Belgium, Guido Westerwelle of Germany, Jean Asselborn of Luxembourg, Maxime Verhagen of the Netherlands, and Jonas Gahr Støre of Norway made the proposal in a Feb. 26 letter to NATO Secretary-General Anders Fogh Rasmussen. They said the NATO foreign ministers meeting next month in Tallinn, Estonia, provides “an opportunity to open a comprehensive discussion on these issues.” NATO’s “future policy requires the full support of all Allies,” they said.

The initiative follows several high-level calls for NATO to change its current nuclear sharing policy under which an estimated 150-250 U.S. nuclear gravity bombs are stationed in 87 aircraft shelters at six bases in five NATO countries.

Shortly after taking office, Germany’s coalition government said in an Oct. 24 statement that, in the context of upcoming talks on a new Strategic Concept for NATO, Berlin “will advocate a withdrawal of remaining nuclear weapons from Germany, both within NATO and vis-à-vis our American allies.” NATO states are scheduled to produce an updated Strategic Concept for the alliance by November.

Separately, Swedish Foreign Minister Carl Bildt and Polish Foreign Minister Radek Sikorski called on the United States and Russia to achieve “early progress on steep reductions in sub-strategic nuclear weapons” in a Feb. 1 joint op-ed in The International Herald Tribune.

“We still face security challenges in the Europe of today and tomorrow, but from whichever angle you look, there is no role for the use of nuclear weapons in resolving these challenges,” Bildt and Sikorski wrote.

Russia is estimated to possess about 2,000 tactical nuclear weapons in various states of readiness. Moscow has indicated that its willingness to discuss the matter depends on the removal of U.S. tactical warheads from NATO bases in Europe. In January 2009, Hillary Rodham Clinton, then the secretary of state-designate, said the United States supports future nuclear arms talks with Russia addressing all types of nuclear weapons—deployed and nondeployed, strategic and nonstrategic.

At a Feb. 23 press briefing in Washington, U.S. Ambassador to NATO Ivo Daalder said, “This is a discussion we want to have with allies…. [I]t is not something that we want to do unilaterally, and we don’t want any other ally to move in a direction unilaterally to try to change the NATO nuclear discussion.”

 

 

The foreign ministers of five NATO countries last month called for a discussion of what the alliance can do to advance nuclear arms control and said “the inclusion of sub-strategic nuclear weapons in subsequent steps towards nuclear disarmament” should be part of the discussion.

Daryl Kimball Discussing Missile Defense on Russia Today

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On September 17th, Daryl Kimball spoke with Russia Today about President Obama's plans for missile defense.

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On September 17th, Daryl Kimball spoke with Russia Today about President Obama's plans for missile defense.

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Daryl Kimball Discusses the Role of Nuclear Weapons at STRATCOM

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On July 29, 2009 ACA Executive Director Daryl Kimball spoke to STRATCOM at its 2009 Deterrence Symposium. He was a member of a panel on the "Role of Nuclear Weapons in the 21st Century U.S. National Security Strategy." Fellow panelists included Frank Miller and Dr. Brad Roberts.

Click here to watch the panel.

Daryl at STRATCOM

 

 

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On July 29, 2009 ACA Executive Director Daryl Kimball spoke to STRATCOM at its 2009 Deterrence Symposium. He was a member of a panel on the "Role of Nuclear Weapons in the 21st Century U.S. National Security Strategy."

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Daryl Kimball Discussing U.S.-Russian Efforts on Nuclear Arms Limits on NPR

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In July 2009, Daryl Kimball appeared on NPR's Morning Edition to discuss U.S.-Russian diplomacy. The segment was about U.S.-Russian efforts towards reducing nuclear arms. Listen to him here. A transcript of the segment can be found here.

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In July 2009, Daryl Kimball appeared on NPR to discuss U.S.-Russian diplomacy.

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Daryl Kimball Discussing START at Press Conference

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On July 6, 2009, C-Span recorded an ACA press conference where Daryl Kimball and Morton Halperin discussed the Moscow Summit and the START follow-on negotiations. A transcript of this event is available here.

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Click here to watch the press conference.

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On July 6, 2009, C-Span recorded an ACA press conference where Daryl Kimball and Morton Halperin discussed the Moscow Summit and the START follow-on negotiations.

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Arms Control Association Announces New Research Director, Tom Collina

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For Immediate Release: June 8, 2009
Press Contact: Daryl G. Kimball, Executive Director, (202) 463-8270 x 107

(Washington, D.C.) Today, the Arms Control Association announced that Tom Collina will join the staff as its Research Director beginning July 1.

Tom Z. Collina has over 20 years of Washington D.C. experience in arms control and global security issues. He has held senior leadership positions such as Executive Director of the 2020 Vision Education Fund, Director of the Global Security Program at the Union of Concerned Scientists, Executive Director of the Institute for Science and International Security and Senior Research Analyst at the Federation of American Scientists.
Collina portrait
Tom's past research and policy advocacy has focused on advancing efforts to strengthen the nonproliferation regime and reduce the risk of nuclear terrorism, including the indefinite extension of the nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty, negotiation of a the zero-yield Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty, and reductions in U.S.-Russian strategic arsenals.

He has published over 50 articles in major magazines and journals and has appeared frequently in the national media, including The New York Times, CNN, and NPR. Tom has testified before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee and briefed congressional staff on numerous occasions. Tom has a degree in International Relations from Cornell University and serves on the Boards of Directors of the Scoville Peace Fellowship and the Janelia Foundation.

Collina will concentrate on nuclear weapons policy, nuclear arms control, missile defense and missile nonproliferation, and nuclear testing policy issues and contribute to the ACA's monthly journal, Arms Control Today.

"We very pleased Tom Collina will be with ACA to augment our already strong research and policy team at this time, when so many important arms control opportunities and decisions are before U.S. and global decision-makers," said Daryl G. Kimball, executive director of the Arms Control Association.

Daryl Kimball Discussing the Threat of Nuclear Weapons on NPR

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On May 27, 2009, Daryl Kimball appeared on the Diane Rehm Show for a segment about "The Threat of Nuclear Weapons." Click here to listen.

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On May 27, 2009, Daryl Kimball appeared on the Diane Rehm Show for a segment about "The Threat of Nuclear Weapons."

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Daryl Kimball Discussing Arms Control on Bloggingheads

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In October 2008 Daryl Kimball appeared with Mark Leon Goldberg on Bloggingheads TV. In this wide-ranging conversation, they discussed some of the new optimism in the arms control community, as well as the need for continued international diplomacy towards Iran and North Korea.

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In October 2008 Daryl Kimball appeared with Mark Leon Goldberg on Bloggingheads TV. In this wide-ranging conversation, they discussed some of the new optimism in the arms control community, as well as the need for continued international diplomacy towards Iran and North Korea.

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