Login/Logout

*
*  

"No one can solve this problem alone, but together we can change things for the better." 

– Setsuko Thurlow
Hiroshima Survivor
June 6, 2016
Nuclear Nonproliferation

Report of the Canberra Commission on the Elimination of Nuclear Weapons

Report of the Canberra Commission on the Elimination of Nuclear Weapons

Please contact ACA for a copy of this story.

The UNSCOM Experience: Implications for U.S. Arms Control Policy

African Nuclear-Weapons-Free Zone Treaty

Description: 

This treaty, also known as the Treaty of Pelindaba, ensures the denuclearization of Africa.

Body: 

 

The African Nuclear-Weapons-Free Zone Treaty, also known as the Treaty of Pelindaba, was signed by 47 of the continent’s 53 states, and prohibits states from conducting research on, developing, manufacturing, stockpiling, acquiring, possessing, or having control over any nuclear explosive device by any means anywhere. Parties are also banned from receiving assistance on research or development, and cannot station any nuclear explosive device on their territory. Encouragement for a state that breaks any component of this Treaty is also prohibited. States do have the decision regarding whether or not to allow foreign ships and aircrafts to pass through their borders. The treaty does not prohibit from peaceful nuclear activities but states are obligated to undergo verification by the IAEA.

Opened for Signature: 11 April 1996

Entry into force: 15 July 2009

Official Text: http://disarmament.un.org/treaties/t/pelindaba/text

Status and Signatories: http://disarmament.un.org/treaties/t/pelindaba

ACA Backgrounder: https://www.armscontrol.org/factsheets/nwfz

Subject Resources:

Agreed Framework Between The United States of America And The Democratic People's Republic of Korea

Description: 

This framework between the United States and the DPRK resolves the nuclear issue on the Korean Peninsula by replacing the DPRK’s graphite moderated reactors and related facilities with other alternative energy arrangements.

Body: 
 

The Agreed Framework between the United States of America and the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea seeks to resolve the issue of nuclear reactors and plants on the Korean Peninsula. The United States and the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea agreed to replace any graphite moderated reactors and related facilities with other alternative energy arrangements. One such alternative could have been the light-water reactor power plant.

Opened for Signature: 21 October 1994

Entry into force: pending

Official Text: http://www.nti.org/media/pdfs/aptagframe.pdf

Status and Signatories: http://www.nti.org/learn/treaties-and-regimes/us-dprk-agreed-framework/

ACA Backgrounder: https://www.armscontrol.org/factsheets/agreedframework

Country Resources:

Subject Resources:

South Pacific Nuclear Weapons Free Zone Treaty (Treaty of Rarotonga)

Description: 

This prohibits the manufacture, possession, or control of nuclear explosives, the dumping of radioactive wastes at sea within the defined zone, and the testing or stationing nuclear explosive devices within state territories.

Body: 
 

The South Pacific Nuclear Weapons Free Zone Treaty, or Treaty of Rarotonga, prohibits states from manufacturing or controlling nuclear explosive devices anywhere inside or outside the Treaty zone. States cannot receive assistance or assist other states in endeavors to acquire or manufacture nuclear explosive devices. Also, states cannot provide sources or equipment to both non-nuclear weapon and nuclear weapon states, unless it is approved by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Testing, stationing, or dumping is prohibited. The zone covers the South Pacific and states within the zone are subject to verification and compliance standards by the IAEA.

Opened for Signature: 6 August 1985

Entry into force: 11 December 1986

Official Text: http://disarmament.un.org/treaties/t/rarotonga/text

Status and Signatories: http://disarmament.un.org/treaties/t/rarotonga

ACA Backgrounder: https://www.armscontrol.org/factsheets/nwfz

Subject Resources:

Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty (NPT)

Description: 

This treaty is the basis of international cooperation on stopping the spread of nuclear weapons by promoting disarmament, nonproliferation, and peaceful uses of nuclear energy.

Body: 
 

The Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty (NPT) is the only multilateral treaty with the goal of creating a binding commitment of disarmament by nuclear-weapon states. NPT seeks to promote cooperation in the field of peaceful nuclear technology and prevent the spread of nuclear weapons and weapons technology. More states have ratified the NPT than any other treaty on arms limitation and disarmament. Every five years, the Treaty’s operations are reviewed. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) verifies compliance with the Treaty.

Opened for Signature: 1 July 1968

Entry into force: 5 March 1970

Official Text: http://disarmament.un.org/treaties/t/npt/text

Status and Signatories: http://disarmament.un.org/treaties/t/npt

ACA Backgrounder: https://www.armscontrol.org/factsheets/nptfact

Latin America Nuclear Weapons Free Zone Treaty (Treaty of Tlatelolco)

Description: 

This treaty prohibits Latin American states from not only acquiring and possessing nuclear weapons, but also from allowing the storage or deployment of nuclear weapons on their territories by other states.

Body: 
 

The Latin America Nuclear Weapons Free Zone Treaty (or Treaty of Tlatelolco) prohibits Latin American parties from acquiring or possessing nuclear weapons and storing and deploying weapons from other states on their territory. There are two zones in the Treaty covered by Protocols I and II. Protocol I involves non-Latin American countries with territories in the nuclear-free zone. Protocol II involves an undertaking by powers that possess nuclear weapons. States with nuclear material are obligated to use these materials strictly for peaceful purposes. The Treaty also prohibits states who encourage other states to break components of the Treaty. The Agency for the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons in Latin America (OPANAL) performs inspections to ensure compliance.

Opened for Signature: 14 February 1967

Entry into force: For each government individually

Official Text: http://disarmament.un.org/treaties/t/tlatelolco/text

Status and Signatories: http://disarmament.un.org/treaties/t/tlatelolco

ACA Backgrounder: https://www.armscontrol.org/factsheets/nwfz

Subject Resources:

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Nuclear Nonproliferation