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Russia

  • Arms Control Today
    July 2, 2010

    Building on their progress on arms control and nonproliferation, President Barack Obama and Russian President Dmitry Medvedev met at the White House June 24 and issued a joint statement saying the two nations would continue their efforts to share early-warning data on missile launches. That effort, first promoted a decade ago as a way to buttress Russia’s weak early-warning system, is now seen as a way to advance U.S.-Russian cooperation on ballistic missile defense.

  • Arms Control Today
    June 4, 2010

    President Barack Obama on May 10 transmitted to Congress an agreement for civilian nuclear cooperation with Russia, reviving questions on Capitol Hill over Russian nuclear and missile-related assistance to Iran.

  • Arms Control Today
    June 4, 2010

    Seeking Senate approval by year’s end, the White House transmitted the New Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty (New START) and related documentation to the Senate May 13. On April 29, the Senate Foreign Relations Committee began a series of hearings on the treaty with current and former administration officials, all of whom supported the pact.

  • Threat Assessment Brief
    May 17, 2010

    The multilayered limits of the original Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty (START) and the elaborate verification measures flowing out of them were born of the difficult negotiations conducted in the waning days of the Soviet Union. The streamlined verification measures in the New START agreement, finalized in April 2010, are an appropriate response to the replacement treaty’s specific limits, which are designed to address post-Cold War realities. Combining proof-tested measures from 15 years of START implementation with new approaches to contemporary challenges, New START verification provisions are well suited to fulfill their core function. These provisions promise to permit the same high confidence in compliance achieved when the original START was in force, but will do so with more focused and up-to-date methods, including innovative verification provisions for monitoring deployed warhead ceilings.

  • Issue Briefs
    May 13, 2010

    Volume 1, Number 4

    The New Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty (New START) signed by the United States and Russia on April 8, 2010 has garnered substantial support from current and former senior national security officials and the U.S. military. As the Senate prepares for formal hearings on New START to begin next week, the following are some of the most prominent recent statements of support.

  • Treaties & Agreements
    May 10, 2010

    New START - Signed April, 2010

  • Arms Control Today
    May 5, 2010

    Setting the stage for what could be a major showdown with Senate Republicans, President Barack Obama and Russian President Dmitry Medvedev signed the New Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty (New START) April 8 in Prague. The signing of the treaty “demonstrates the determination of the United States and Russia—the two nations that hold over 90 percent of the world’s nuclear weapons—to pursue responsible global leadership,” Obama said. Medvedev said, “What matters most is that this is a win-win situation.… [B]oth parties have won. And taking into account this victory of ours, the entire world community has won.”

  • Press Room
    April 12, 2010

    President Obama's new nuclear policy reduces the role of U.S. nuclear weapons in the country's security strategy and moves the United States and Russia toward a more stable strategic relationship with each side having lower levels of nuclear arms.

  • Press Room
    April 8, 2010

    Today in Prague, Presidents Barack Obama and Dmitry Medvedev signed the most important nuclear arms reduction treaty in nearly two decades. The New Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty (START) puts Washington and Moscow back on the path of verifiable reductions of their still-bloated Cold War nuclear arsenals and renewed cooperation on other vital nuclear security priorities.

  • Arms Control Today
    April 2, 2010

    U.S. and Russian negotiators have concluded a new strategic arms agreement to replace the 1991 Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty (START I), which expired in December. Presidents Barack Obama and Dmitry Medvedev are to meet in Prague on April 8 to sign New START. If the Senate and the Russian Duma ratify the treaty, the United States and Russia each will be limited to 1,550 deployed strategic warheads on no more than 800 deployed and non-deployed strategic nuclear delivery vehicles—a steep cut from the levels of START I, which permitted each side 6,000 warheads on 1,600 strategic nuclear delivery vehicles (SNDVs) or launchers. The New START limit on deployed strategic nuclear warheads would be 30 percent below the 2,200 target set by the 2002 Strategic Offensive Reductions Treaty. (Continue)

  • Arms Control Today
    March 31, 2010

    In a statement that triggered a public dispute with the United States, Russian Prime Minister Vladimir Putin said last month Russia would help Iran’s first nuclear power plant begin operations this summer. The March 18 announcement, made during a Russian nuclear industry conference, coincided with a visit to Russia by Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, who criticized the move.

  • Arms Control Today
    March 31, 2010

    Wrapping up a year of intense negotiations and missed deadlines in which the presidents of Russia and the United States reportedly met or spoke on the telephone 14 times, President Barack Obama announced March 26 at a White House press briefing that “a pivotal new arms control agreement,” the New Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty (New START), was finished and would be signed April 8 in Prague. Flanked by Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, Secretary of Defense Robert Gates, and Joint Chiefs of Staff Chairman Adm. Michael Mullen, Obama said the two countries had just agreed to “the most comprehensive arms control agreement in nearly two decades.”

  • Press Room
    March 30, 2010

    The conclusion of talks on the New Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty is a major diplomatic achievement. Yet, the signing of New START is only the first step toward the president's goal of reducing "the number and the role of nuclear weapons" worldwide, writes Daryl G. Kimball in the following editorial in the April issue of Arms Control Today.

  • Arms Control Today
    March 30, 2010

    U.S. and Russian negotiators, with a push from Presidents Barack Obama and Dmitry Medvedev, have concluded the most important strategic nuclear arms reduction treaty in nearly two decades. The New Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty (START), which will be signed in Prague April 8, puts Washington and Moscow back on the path of verifiable reductions of their still-bloated Cold War nuclear arsenals and renewed cooperation on other vital nuclear security priorities.

    The treaty would limit each side to no more than 700 deployed strategic nuclear delivery vehicles and 1,550 deployed strategic warheads, which is 30 percent below the existing warhead limit. Just as importantly, New START would replace the 1991 START verification regime, which expired last December, with a more effective and up-to-date system to monitor compliance for the 10-year life of the new pact. (Continue)

  • Press Room
    March 26, 2010

    After months of negotiations, U.S. President Barack Obama and Russian President Dmitry Medvedev have concluded a New START Treaty to replace the highly successful 1991 START Treaty, which expired December 5. ACA has produced a fact sheet to help educate policy-makers and the public about the historical context of this new treaty.