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ACA's journal, Arms Control Today, remains the best in the market. Well focused. Solidly researched. Prudent.

– Hans Blix,
former IAEA Director-General
U.S. Nuclear Weapons

DOE Proposes Downsized Weapons Complex

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Retired Generals Re-Ignite Debate Over Abolition of Nuclear Weapons

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Arms Control and the 105th Congress

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U.S. and Soviet/Russian Strategic Nuclear Forces: Past, Present and Projected

U.S. and Soviet/Russian Strategic Nuclear Forces: Past, Present and Projected

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ACA Candidates' Forum: The Questions in 1996

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Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty

Description: 

This treaty between the United States and the Soviet Union requires destruction of ground-launched ballistic and cruise missiles with certain ranges, and associated equipment within three years of the Treaty entering into force.

Body: 
 

The Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty required that both the United States and the Soviet Union destroy their ground-launched ballistic and cruise missiles with the range of 500 to 5000 kilometers, as well as the missiles’ launchers and support structures. This was to be met three years after the Treaty gets entered into force. As the Soviet Union reached nuclear parity with the United States and started vamping up the qualitative element of their missiles, this Treaty helped pacify the arms race between the United States and the Soviet Union. Several proposals were made between President Reagan and General Secretary Gorbachev. When the Soviet Union dissolved, the United States sought full implementation of the INF Treaty with twelve former Soviet republics.

Opened for Signature: 8 December 1987

Entry into force: 1 June 1988

Official Text: http://www.state.gov/t/avc/trty/102360.htm#text

Status and Signatories: http://www.state.gov/t/avc/trty/102360.htm#narrative

ACA Backgrounder: https://www.armscontrol.org/factsheets/INFtreaty

Country Resources:

Strategic Arms Limitation Talks II (SALT II)

Description: 

This treaty between the United States and the Soviet Union replaced the Interim Agreement with a long-term comprehensive treaty that provided broad limits on strategic offensive weapons systems.

Body: 
 

The Strategic Arms Limitation Talks II (SALT II) replaced the Interim Agreement. The Treaty came close to entering into force, but when U.S. President Ronald Reagan declared that the Soviet Union violated its political commitment to the Treaty, Reagan decided an interim framework, obligating the restraint from undercutting existing arms agreements, would work for the United States. SALT II would have called for numerical limits on missiles, bans on certain missiles, definitions of limited systems, and verifications. Actions by the United States and the Soviet Union would have been verified through photo-reconnaissance satellites. The Treaty would have been in effect through 1985.

Opened for Signature: 18 June 1979

Entry into force: never

Official Text: http://www.state.gov/t/isn/5195.htm#treaty

Status and Signatories: http://www.state.gov/t/isn/5195.htm#narrative

ACA Backgrounder: https://www.armscontrol.org/factsheets/USRussiaNuclearAgreementsMarch2010

Subject Resources:

Strategic Arms Limitation Talks (SALT I)

Description: 

These negotiations between the United States and the Soviet Union slowed the arms race in strategic ballistic missiles armed with nuclear weapons by curbing the manufacture of strategic missiles capable of carrying nuclear weapons.

Body: 
 

Begun in November 1969, by May 1972, the Strategic Arms Limitation Talks (SALT) had produced both the Anti-Ballistic Missile (ABM) Treaty, which limited strategic missile defenses to 200 (later 100) interceptors each, and the Interim Agreement Between the United States of America and the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics on Certain Measures with Respect to the Limitation of Strategic Offensive Arms (Interim Agreement or SALT I), an executive agreement that capped U.S. and Soviet intercontinental ballistic missiles (ICBM) and submarine-launched ballistic missile (SLBM) forces. Under the Interim Agreement, both sides pledged not to construct new ICBM silos, not to increase the size of existing ICBM silos “significantly,” and capped the number of SLBM launch tubes and SLBM-carrying submarines. The agreement ignored strategic bombers and did not address warhead numbers, leaving both sides free to enlarge their forces by deploying multiple warheads (MIRVs) onto their ICBMs and SLBMs and increasing their bomber-based forces. The agreement limited the United States to 1,054 ICBM silos and 656 SLBM launch tubes. The Soviet Union was limited to 1,607 ICBM silos and 740 SLBM launch tubes. In June 2002, the United States unilaterally withdrew from the ABM treaty.

Official Text: https://media.nti.org/documents/salt_1.pdf

Narrative Background on the Talks: http://www.state.gov/t/isn/5191.htm

More U.S.-Russian Nuclear Agreements: https://www.armscontrol.org/factsheets/USRussiaNuclearAgreements

Subject Resources:

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