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"I find hope in the work of long-established groups such as the Arms Control Association...[and] I find hope in younger anti-nuclear activists and the movement around the world to formally ban the bomb."

– Vincent Intondi
Author, "African Americans Against the Bomb: Nuclear Weapons, Colonialism, and the Black Freedom Movement
July 1, 2020
Arms Control Association

Use for factsheets and other jointly written or anonymous content

Nuclear Challenges for the Biden Administration in the First 100 Days

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Tuesday, January 19, 2021
11:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. Eastern U.S. Time
via Zoom

Upon taking office Jan. 20, 2021, the new presidential administration is confronting a dizzying array of major challenges, not the least of which are related to the risks posed by the world’s most dangerous weapons. 

In this webinar, senior policy analysts from the Arms Control Association reviewed the most consequential nuclear weapons policy challenges and the decisions that the new Biden administration will need to address in its first 100 days—and sooner — and outline their recommendations on the steps that would make the United States and the world safer from the threats posed by nuclear weapons.

 

The speakers elaborated upon the recommendations in the new report, "Nuclear Challenges for the Biden Administration in the First 100 Days," including measures to adjust nuclear launch procedures, extend the New START agreement, return to the Iran nuclear deal, and more.

Speakers included:

  • Kelsey Davenport, director for nonproliferation policy
  • Kingston Reif, director for disarmament and threat reduction policy
  • Daryl G. Kimball, executive director
  • Tom Countryman, fmr. acting undersecretary of state for arms control and international security, and ACA’s board chair, moderating
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Analysts will review the most consequential nuclear weapons challenges that the incoming administration will need to address in its first 100 days and outline their recommendations as described in the new report, "Nuclear Challenges for the Biden Administration in the First 100 Days."

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Ambassador Bonnie Jenkins and Women of Color Advancing Peace and Security Voted 2020 Arms Control Persons of the Year

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For Immediate Release: January 14, 2021

Media Contact: Tony Fleming, director for communications, 202-463-8270 ext. 110

(Washington, D.C.)—Ambassador Bonnie Jenkins and Women of Color Advancing Peace and Security (WCAPS) were selected as the 2020 Arms Control Persons of the Year through an online poll that drew participants from over 65 countries. The annual contest is organized by the independent, nongovernmental Arms Control Association.

Ambassador Jenkins and WCAPS were nominated for catalyzing support and action from leaders and practitioners in the national security and foreign policy communities to increase diversity into their ranks and boards of directors and pursue concrete steps to “root out institutional racism” in the governmental and non-governmental sectors in the field.

Following the wave of protests in 2020 against the police killings of George Floyd and other Black people, WCAPS organized a solidarity statement endorsed by leaders and individuals from 150 organizations and launched working groups to develop concrete strategies and tools to attack the problem.

"It is an honor to be selected for my work and for WCAPS, which represents the dedication of so many amazing individuals within the organization seeking to increase diversity and widen perspectives in the fields of peace, security, and conflict transformation," said Ambassador Jenkins upon being notified of the results.

"I am especially happy to know that a vision I had for many years to give a voice to people of color, particularly women of color, has been so welcome when I was not sure in 2017 what the reception would be for such an organization," she said. "Thank you, Arms Control Association for your many years of valued work in arms control and nonproliferation, and for promoting the importance of a multitude of perspectives for better policies."

Thomas Countryman, board chairman of the Arms Control Association remarked, “Any nation that shuts out more than half of its best minds from solving its most urgent issues condemns itself to second-rate solutions. Ambassador Bonnie Jenkins’ dedication will mean that we can have a national security apparatus that is not only diverse but also first-rate."

This year, six individuals and groups were nominated by the Arms Control Association staff and board of directors. All of the nominees demonstrated extraordinary leadership in advancing effective arms control solutions for the threats posed by mass casualty weapons during the course of 2020.

The runners-up was a group of Members of Congress who introduced legislation to prohibit funding for new U.S. nuclear tests and to establish a rigorous congressional approval and review process to guard against any unilateral move by the president to resume nuclear testing in the future in response to reports that the Trump administration was considering resuming U.S. nuclear testing for the first time in 28 years.

This contest is a reminder of the diverse and creative ways that dedicated individuals and organizations from around the globe can contribute to meeting the difficult arms control challenges of today and the coming decades.

Online voting was open from Dec. 22, 2020, until Jan. 13, 2021.

Previous winners of the "Arms Control Person(s) of the Year" were:

Description: 

Ambassador Jenkins and WCAPS were nominated for catalyzing support and action from leaders and practitioners in the national security and foreign policy communities to increase diversity into their ranks and boards of directors and pursue concrete steps to “root out institutional racism” in the governmental and non-governmental sectors in the field.

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