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Tom Z. Collina

Tom Collina PortraitTom Z. Collina has over 20 years of Washington DC experience in arms control and global security issues. He has held senior leadership positions such as Executive Director of the Institute for Science and International Security, Director of Global Security at the Union of Concerned Scientists, and Senior Research Analyst at the Federation of American Scientists.

Tom has worked extensively as a researcher, analyst, and advocate to strengthen the nonproliferation regime and reduce the risk of nuclear terrorism, achieve a Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty, reduce U.S.-Russian strategic arsenals, and track the spread of weapons worldwide. He has published widely in major magazines and journals and has appeared frequently in the national media, including The New York Times, CNN, and NPR. He has testified before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee and regularly briefs congressional staff. Tom has a degree in International Relations from Cornell University and serves on the Boards of Directors of the Scoville Peace Fellowship and the Janelia Foundation. He lives in Takoma Park with his wife and three children


Tom Collina's primary research areas include:

Read more by Tom Z. Collina:

  • Arms Control Today
    March 4, 2014

    The Defense Department has launched a three-month review of U.S. nuclear forces in response to reports that Air Force missile officers have been cheating on performance tests.

  • Arms Control Today
    March 4, 2014

    The United States said Russia may have breached a landmark arms control accord by testing a new cruise missile, but has not concluded that Russia violated the treaty.

  • Arms Control Today
    March 4, 2014

    Congress gave full funding to the program to rebuild the B61 nuclear gravity bomb, but required detailed reports on alternatives and the eventual retirement of a different bomb, the B83.

  • Arms Control Today
    March 4, 2014

    The Pentagon’s chief weapons tester has called for the redesign of a key component of the U.S. long-range missile interceptor system, raising questions about plans to expand it.

  • Issue Briefs
    January 14, 2014

    The United States plans to spend at least $355 billion to maintain and rebuild its nuclear arsenal over the next decade, according to a new report by the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office (CBO). Over the next 30 years, the bill could add up to $1 trillion, according to another independent estimate.